Difference between revisions of "Participation Rates by Race in Economics, the Social Sciences, and STEM fields"

From Diversifying Economic Quality: A Wiki for Instructors and Departments

Jump to: navigation, search
Line 7: Line 7:
  
 
'''Click on the graphs above to zoom.'''
 
'''Click on the graphs above to zoom.'''
 +
 +
  
 
'''Summary:''' The data above demonstrates that underrepresented minorities in the field of economics should be paid attention to. The significant difference in participation is especially evident for Black and Hispanic students. In 2009, 5.3 percent of bachelor’s degrees in Economics were awarded to Black students, where areas in STEM fields Black students were awarded 8 percent of degrees, and in Social Science fields 10.1 percent of degrees. In 2009, 6.4 percent of bachelor’s degrees in Economics were awarded to Hispanic students, where areas in STEM fields Hispanic students were awarded 7.3 percent of bachelor’s degrees, and 9.9 percent of the bachelor’s degrees in the Social Sciences.  
 
'''Summary:''' The data above demonstrates that underrepresented minorities in the field of economics should be paid attention to. The significant difference in participation is especially evident for Black and Hispanic students. In 2009, 5.3 percent of bachelor’s degrees in Economics were awarded to Black students, where areas in STEM fields Black students were awarded 8 percent of degrees, and in Social Science fields 10.1 percent of degrees. In 2009, 6.4 percent of bachelor’s degrees in Economics were awarded to Hispanic students, where areas in STEM fields Hispanic students were awarded 7.3 percent of bachelor’s degrees, and 9.9 percent of the bachelor’s degrees in the Social Sciences.  

Revision as of 18:58, 18 July 2011

EconByRace.png
SSRace.png

STEMRace.png



Click on the graphs above to zoom.


Summary: The data above demonstrates that underrepresented minorities in the field of economics should be paid attention to. The significant difference in participation is especially evident for Black and Hispanic students. In 2009, 5.3 percent of bachelor’s degrees in Economics were awarded to Black students, where areas in STEM fields Black students were awarded 8 percent of degrees, and in Social Science fields 10.1 percent of degrees. In 2009, 6.4 percent of bachelor’s degrees in Economics were awarded to Hispanic students, where areas in STEM fields Hispanic students were awarded 7.3 percent of bachelor’s degrees, and 9.9 percent of the bachelor’s degrees in the Social Sciences.


Source

U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics (NCES); Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System(IPEDS) Completions, 1995-2009 (Washington , D.C.: NCES, 2011). Created by data provided by WebCaspar.