Difference between revisions of "Participation data"

From Diversifying Economic Quality: A Wiki for Instructors and Departments

Jump to: navigation, search
(Gender)
 
(87 intermediate revisions by 4 users not shown)
Line 1: Line 1:
In this section, data has been compiled to present patterns of participation for members of various groups at various stages in the field of Economics.
+
[[File:EconDegnew.png|120px|left|link=Undergraduate participation data]]
 +
According to data collected by the AEA, just over 10 percent of full professors in Ph.D. granting Economics departments are women and only 3 percent are African American or Hispanic.  Disproportionate participation rates continue in the current undergraduate population as well; about one-third of undergraduate economics majors are women, and about 10 percent are students of color. These participation rates are lower than those typically observed in science and engineering.
 +
[[File:DocEcon.png|left|120px|link=Doctorate participation data]]
 +
[[File:Bhfacinfograph.png|122px|left|link=Faculty participation data]]
 +
The lower participation rates of women and ethnic/racial minorities in Economics is a problem at all levels of education. Often discussion focuses on the "leak" along the academic pipeline, where the academic pipeline is a metaphor for the procession of students from high school graduates to the end point in academia, tenured professorships. Originally coined to describe the dearth of women in STEM fields, this metaphor is now used more universally to describe how women and members of minority groups are absent from higher ranks of academia. 
 +
The data cited here, however, reveal that our profession has a particular problem at the undergraduate level. A recent [http://www.aeaweb.org/committees/CSMGEP/resources/ report] by the AEA's Committee on the Status of Minority Groups in the Economics Profession documents this problem well: "...the underrepresentation of Blacks and Hispanics among econ Ph.D.s relates to their underrepresentation among econ undergraduates, and not necessarily from a lack of interest of minority econ majors in pursuing a Ph.D." (Mora, 2012).
 +
 +
Without encouraging greater interest at the undergraduate level, attempts to increase the participation rates of women and minorities at higher levels are unlikely to succeed.
 +
 +
'''The following sections present patterns of participation for members of various groups at various stages in the field of Economics.'''
  
==Race==
+
::::::* [[Undergraduate participation data]]
  
'''Summary:''' The data below demonstrates that underrepresented minorities in the field of economics should be paid attention to. In comparison to the field of Political Science/Public Administration, Black students account for 4.9% of Bachelor's degrees in Economics where areas they account for 9.4% of Bachelor's degrees in Political Science/Public Administration. Hispanic students account for 5.8% of Economics degrees where areas they account for 9.9% of Political Science/Public Administration degrees.
+
::::::* [[Doctorate participation data]]
  
 +
::::::* [[Faculty participation data]]
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 +
For more information, see
  
'''Source:''' U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics (NCES); Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System(IPEDS) Completions, 1995-2009 (Washington , D.C.: NCES, 2011). Created by data provided by WebCaspar.
+
*[https://www.newyorkfed.org/data-and-statistics/data-visualization/diversity-in-economics#interactive/overview Who is Being Trained in Economics? The Race, Ethnicity, and Gender of Economics Majors at U.S. Colleges and Universities]
  
 +
*[https://doi.org/10.1080/00220485.2019.1618766 The Unequal Distribution of Economic Education], Bayer, A., & Wilcox, D. W. (2019). ''The Journal of Economic Education'', 1-22.
  
 +
*[https://www.aeaweb.org/articles?id=10.1257/jep.30.4.221 Diversity in the Economics Profession: A New Attack on an Old Problem], Bayer, A., & Rouse, C. E. (2016). ''Journal of Economic Perspectives'', 30(4), 221-42.
  
[[File:PoliSciByRace.png|470px|right|Source: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics (NCES); Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System(IPEDS) Completions, 1995-2009 (Washington , D.C.: NCES, 2011). Created by data provided by WebCaspar.]]
+
*[https://www.aeaweb.org/content/file?id=570 Where are the Women Economics Majors?] CSWEP Newsletter, Summer 2013.
  
[[File:EconByRace.png|470px|left|Source: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics (NCES); Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System(IPEDS) Completions, 1995-2009 (Washington , D.C.: NCES, 2011). Created by data provided by WebCaspar.]]
+
*[https://www.aeaweb.org/content/file?id=9270 Report of the Committee on the Status of Women in the Economics Profession], 2018.
  
 +
*[https://www.aeaweb.org/content/file?id=9030 Report on the Committee on the Status of Minority Groups in the Economics Profession], 2018.
  
Click on the graphs above to zoom.  
+
*[https://www.aeaweb.org/content/file?id=7558 Racial and Ethnic Differences among Economics Baccalaureates], Mora, M.T. (2012) ''The Minority Report.'' AEA 1, 9-11.
 
 
 
 
==Gender==
 
 
 
'''Summary:''' The data below demonstrates that the participation rates of women in Economics also deserves attention. By observing the Political Science/Public Administration degrees awarded in 2009, the percentage of women and men earning this degree were very close to one another. Men were awarded 49.1% of the degrees while women were awarded 50.9% of the degrees.  Although in Economics, men were awarded 69.8% of the degrees while women were only awarded 30.2% of the degrees.
 
 
 
'''Source:''' U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics (NCES); Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System(IPEDS) Completions, 1995-2009 (Washington , D.C.: NCES, 2011). Created by data provided by WebCaspar.
 
 
 
 
 
[[File:EconByGen.png|470px|left|Source: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics (NCES); Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System(IPEDS) Completions, 1995-2009 (Washington , D.C.: NCES, 2011). Created by data provided by WebCaspar.]]
 
 
 
[[File:PoliSciGen.png|470px|right|Source: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics (NCES); Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System(IPEDS) Completions, 1995-2009 (Washington , D.C.: NCES, 2011). Created by data provided by WebCaspar.]]
 
 
 
Click on the graphs above to zoom.
 
 
 
'''Summary:''' The scatterplot below shows a time trend in Economics degrees awarded to men and women. The number of degrees awarded in the field of Economics has steadily increased, which is a sign that the field has attracted more interest. The data also demonstrates that the gap between degrees awarded to men and women in Economics is steadily becoming smaller, although there are still improvements to be made. 
 
 
 
[[File:EconDegYear.png|470px|left]]
 
[[File:EconDeg%.png|470px|right]]
 
 
 
 
 
[[Media:CHAS_Wiki_97-2003.xls|Click here]] to download a basic database of Economics degrees earned by Gender from 1966-2009.
 
 
 
==Comparison Tool==
 
 
 
The comparison tool allows departments to [[compare]] their participation rates to national averages and/or averages for subgroups such as elite liberal arts institutions.
 

Latest revision as of 17:40, 2 December 2019

EconDegnew.png

According to data collected by the AEA, just over 10 percent of full professors in Ph.D. granting Economics departments are women and only 3 percent are African American or Hispanic. Disproportionate participation rates continue in the current undergraduate population as well; about one-third of undergraduate economics majors are women, and about 10 percent are students of color. These participation rates are lower than those typically observed in science and engineering.

DocEcon.png
Bhfacinfograph.png

The lower participation rates of women and ethnic/racial minorities in Economics is a problem at all levels of education. Often discussion focuses on the "leak" along the academic pipeline, where the academic pipeline is a metaphor for the procession of students from high school graduates to the end point in academia, tenured professorships. Originally coined to describe the dearth of women in STEM fields, this metaphor is now used more universally to describe how women and members of minority groups are absent from higher ranks of academia. The data cited here, however, reveal that our profession has a particular problem at the undergraduate level. A recent report by the AEA's Committee on the Status of Minority Groups in the Economics Profession documents this problem well: "...the underrepresentation of Blacks and Hispanics among econ Ph.D.s relates to their underrepresentation among econ undergraduates, and not necessarily from a lack of interest of minority econ majors in pursuing a Ph.D." (Mora, 2012).

Without encouraging greater interest at the undergraduate level, attempts to increase the participation rates of women and minorities at higher levels are unlikely to succeed.

The following sections present patterns of participation for members of various groups at various stages in the field of Economics.


For more information, see