Difference between revisions of "Participation data"

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'''Source:''' U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics (NCES); Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System(IPEDS) Completions, 1995-2009 (Washington , D.C.: NCES, 2011). Created by data provided by WebCaspar.
 
'''Source:''' U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics (NCES); Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System(IPEDS) Completions, 1995-2009 (Washington , D.C.: NCES, 2011). Created by data provided by WebCaspar.
  
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== Time Trends ==
  
 
[[File:EconDegYear.png|470px|left]]
 
[[File:EconDegYear.png|470px|left]]

Revision as of 10:07, 6 July 2011

In this section, data has been compiled to present patterns of participation for members of various groups at various stages in the field of Economics.

Race

Source: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics (NCES); Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System(IPEDS) Completions, 1995-2009 (Washington , D.C.: NCES, 2011). Created by data provided by WebCaspar.
Source: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics (NCES); Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System(IPEDS) Completions, 1995-2009 (Washington , D.C.: NCES, 2011). Created by data provided by WebCaspar.


Click on the graphs above to zoom.

Summary: The data above demonstrates that underrepresented minorities in the field of economics should be paid attention to. In comparison to the field of Political Science/Public Administration, Black students account for 4.9% of Bachelor's degrees in Economics where areas they account for 9.4% of Bachelor's degrees in Political Science/Public Administration. Hispanic students account for 5.8% of Economics degrees where areas they account for 9.9% of Political Science/Public Administration degrees.


Source: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics (NCES); Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System(IPEDS) Completions, 1995-2009 (Washington , D.C.: NCES, 2011). Created by data provided by WebCaspar.

Gender

Source: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics (NCES); Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System(IPEDS) Completions, 1995-2009 (Washington , D.C.: NCES, 2011). Created by data provided by WebCaspar.
Source: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics (NCES); Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System(IPEDS) Completions, 1995-2009 (Washington , D.C.: NCES, 2011). Created by data provided by WebCaspar.


Click on the graphs above to zoom.

Summary: The data above demonstrates that the participation rates of women in Economics also deserves attention. By observing the Political Science/Public Administration degrees awarded in 2009, the percentage of women and men earning this degree were very close to one another. Men were awarded 49.1% of the degrees while women were awarded 50.9% of the degrees. Although in Economics, men were awarded 69.8% of the degrees while women were only awarded 30.2% of the degrees.

Source: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics (NCES); Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System(IPEDS) Completions, 1995-2009 (Washington , D.C.: NCES, 2011). Created by data provided by WebCaspar.

Time Trends

EconDegYear.png
EconDeg%.png


Click on the graphs above to zoom.


Summary: The scatterplot above shows a time trend in Economics degrees awarded to men and women. The number of degrees awarded in the field of Economics has steadily increased, which is a sign that the field has attracted more interest. The data also demonstrates that the gap between degrees awarded to men and women in Economics is steadily becoming smaller, although there are still improvements to be made.


Click here to download a basic database of Economics degrees earned by Gender from 1966-2009.

Comparison Tool

The comparison tool allows departments to compare their participation rates to national averages and/or averages for subgroups such as elite liberal arts institutions.